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Bigger, Faster, Smarter, Friendlier - page 5

The Heart of Linux

  • September 9, 1999
  • By Mike MacCana

As you may have noticed, commercial Linux support for big name titles has kicked off in a big way, with Civilization: Call to Power boxed Quake I and 2, Myth II, and a Linux version of the new mob-oriented first-person shooter, Kingpin. By the end of this year, you can add to that Quake 3, Unreal Tournament, Railroad Tycoon II, Heretic II and Heavy Gear III [both according to rumor], and Descent 3. Other games based on these engines will hopefully also have Linux ports in the pipeline...

Perhaps we owe a debt here to Sony, who have chosen Linux as the development platform of choice for the Playstation 2. There are lots of companies committed to this platform; if they're already running something on Linux while developing it, it makes good business sense to spend a little time releasing a Linux version to an ever-expanding user base of hard-core gamers, right?

Let's not forget some of the great open-source games, either; XRacer [a wipeout-like title] is developing extremely fast [it's only about three months old!]. Tux: A Quest for Herring [Mario64 with more likable main characters] just keeps getting better. The Parsec team, who are creating a space combat game, promise to create not only a spectacularly beautiful and playable game, but a testament to the quality of good open-source development. The Clone team have developed a complete copy of the Warcraft II engine for Linux, but desperately need artists [currently you need the Windows version to play]. As always, if you can help out any of these projects either as a developer, tester, or artist [especially with Clone], please do so.

Linuxgames has quite a nice selection of reports of Wine Success Stories. StarCraft and Nintendo 64 games seem the easiest to set up so far. However, more people are needed to help document their successes!

Conclusion

There's so much happening in the Linux world at the moment that I couldn't possibly list it all. I tried to include projects that were well-developed and for which a lot of information was available, but there may well be a few glaring omissions. If you have any comments, suggestions or corrections, mail me and I'll try and include them in a future column...

 

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