April 24, 2014
 
 
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Review: CorelDraw 9 Graphics Suite for Linux - page 4

Obtaining CorelDraw 9 Graphics Suite

  • November 1, 2000
  • By Michael Hall

Though we're still not entirely happy with the way CorelDRAW's programs perform, there's no denying that this product fills a useful niche for any concept of Linux that includes eventual domination (or even just a healthy share) of non-technical and home desktops.

Old-school Linux fans may not, for instance, be fond of the way the menus and selectors comprising the interface are built; we may not care for the "My Home" and "My Linux" designations used to make the computer seem more familiar to recent Windows immigrants; and we may have plenty of ways to roll our own in terms of PDF production involving fairly simple and common tools. We aren't, however, the point of the exercise, which is to buld a formidable core of usable software that will prove welcoming to users looking to get out from under the Microsoft hegemony on the desktop.

Corel has done an excellent job of addressing its anticipated audience in this regard, giving Linux a look and feel more welcoming to new users. If a shop were, for instance, to have a stable of illustrators already familiar with CorelDRAW, they'd have very little trouble transitioning to a Linux environment, especially if they were presented with a sane default desktop and an hour of orientation to their new surroundings.

In all, we're fairly enthusiastic about CorelDRAW because of the standards it sets in terms of features and usability. It's a polished pair of applications, with good documentation and a sense of underlying slickness. It won't be for everyone, but it's a solid, professional package. We hope some of the niggling performance issues get worked out the next time around, but we're pleased with what Corel has brought to the table.

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